Author Topic: Virtual PC with Linux  (Read 12968 times)

Offline teroyk

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2022, 02:10:24 PM »
What about Fedora 15? If it has kernel 2.6, it should be a bit easier, right? I located it in the official old archives here:
https://archives.fedoraproject.org/pub/archive/fedora/linux/releases/15/Fedora/i386/

VPC6 support DVD, but not in boot. So have to be CD-images. Fedora 14 has:
https://archives.fedoraproject.org/pub/archive/fedora/linux/releases/14/Fedora/i386/iso/
But I think I test Fedora 2 next, because it might be more light weight and it is with kernel 2.6, too:
https://archives.fedoraproject.org/pub/archive/fedora/linux/core/2/i386/iso/

Offline Jubadub

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2022, 02:13:07 PM »
By the way, it seems we might have another incentive to use Linux 2.6 instead of 2.4:

http://bulk.fefe.de/scalability/

It seems like 2.6 is a massive upgrade over 2.4, and overall a very incredible system kernel. This is good to know, as we can alleviate as much load from Virtual PC (and other virtual machines) as we can by keeping this in mind.

Someone also said that all subsequent kernel updates were heavily based on 2.6, which might be very useful for us, in terms of potential compatibility and behavior/features:

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/41713556/what-is-difference-between-linux-kernel-versions

The exact quote:

Quote
In the past, 2.0.x 2.2.x and 2.4.x (even-numbered minor part) were the stable series, and 2.1.x, 2.3.x, and 2.5.x were the development series where major changes took place. When development on 2.1 finished, it became 2.2, 2.3 became 2.4, and 2.5 became 2.6. When 2.6 was released, it was decided not to create a new series, but to continue developing on the 2.6 series. At some point, it was decided to create stable branches off each of the 2.6.x releases, leading to 2.6.x.y releases. Some of those became longterm releases. 3.x and 4.x are a direct continuation of the 2.6 series.

So in many ways 2.6 is the father of all modern-day Linux.

Offline teroyk

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2022, 12:45:19 PM »
By the way, it seems we might have another incentive to use Linux 2.6 instead of 2.4:

I have now tested some Linuxes with kernel 2.6:
Fedora 2, text installer works, but I think it detect VPC 6 "CPU" wrong to P3 with SSE and install wrong kernel.

Fedora 14, Installer get kernel panic. I think kernel of installer needs SSE.

Debian 5, I think it detects VPC 6 "CPU" to P3 with SSE, some real PC owners with 586-processor have same problem. Debian 5.0.10 itself support even 486.

Debian 4.0R8 (debian-40r8-i386-xfce-CD-1.iso), works, but I don't find another installation isos and it needs more installation CDs (because have to install RPM or Alien), before I can try to install additions. btw here is sums of all isos of that version: https://get.debian.org/images/archive/4.0_r8/i386/iso-cd/MD5SUMS

EDIT: I noticed that there is also Debian 4.0R9 and those sums: https://get.debian.org/images/archive/4.0_r9/i386/iso-cd/MD5SUMS ,but no ISOs.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2022, 01:38:11 PM by teroyk »

Offline teroyk

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2022, 11:39:42 AM »
Now tested Debian 4.0R9. Works with xfce-CD1. But needs Linux guru to install additions. Actually additions iso mounts with terminal command mount /dev/cdrom. Needs convert rpm-packages to deb-packages with alien-command (I used normal CD4 and depencies needed CD2, but not CD3 needed sofar)..but errors in post-installation that I cannot solve. So not easy install additions for Debian. Without additions speed is little slower than Red Hat 8.0.

Offline teroyk

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2022, 03:28:41 AM »
If Connectix VPCs has same problem that those MS VPCs, It might be that we should avoid at least Kernel versions 2.6.24 - 2.6.30:
https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=463606
More about long NOP (no operation) command bug:
https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=464962#143
It has interesting code listing that somebody skill full enough can test has VPC 6 same problem with Linux.
...ok i might be skill full enough, but I have some another VPC stuff for test on my hands.

btw..I think that NOPL command is made only for make older PC not compatible, bad Intel  >:(

Offline teroyk

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2023, 12:31:29 AM »
Although official Virtual PC additions should work with old kernels...it might not be stupid idea to try compile more modern Debian for Virtual PC "Pentiium II hardware" and forget additions for that version.

Offline Jubadub

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Re: Virtual PC with Linux
« Reply #26 on: July 20, 2023, 10:13:27 PM »
Although official Virtual PC additions should work with old kernels...it might not be stupid idea to try compile more modern Debian for Virtual PC "Pentiium II hardware" and forget additions for that version.

Or two virtual machines: an older Debian one with additions, and a newer one without. Recompiling things to target "Pentium II with MMX" is a good idea!

Personally I am very interested in Debian 6 and 7: Kernel is deblobbed from spyware-friendly firmware, and they don't use systemd by default like they do starting with Debian 8. I also have no respect for Debian 8, a release that officially supported PowerPC, yet  did not provide 8.11.1 for platforms beyond the usual Intel/AMD/ARM CPU spyware stack (meaning PowerPC, MIPS etc. stop at 8.11.0 as far as official releases go). And starting with Debian 9, PowerPC got discontinued and moved to "ports". Although for Virtual PC purposes we can look at Debian 9 and beyond, naturally.

Anyway, let's see what we can do. Currently I'm creating a "Debian archive" of all those notorious "Jigdo-reliant" ISOs, getting them ready for upload on archive.org (for ALL jigdo-downloaded files and CPU architectures) and some key releases also on Macintosh Garden. This way we all can have easy, reliable access to ALL Debian releases. It will take some months, because the jigdo mechanisms suck and are unreliable and not all libs that make up the ISOs are available at all times, although I do see how it greatly preserves bandwidth.