Author Topic: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?  (Read 705 times)

Offline V.Yakob

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Hi everybody!

I have PowerMac G4 MDD (FW400, 2003), I can't boot into Mac OS 9.2.2. For 1 month I've been trying to launch Mac OS, discussing my numerous attempts in the topic of forum.
Sometimes the OS boots with errors or failures, but in most cases I only get a gray screen.
There is a suspicion that this MDD has incompatible or faulty equipment.

The last time I started booting Mac OS 9, I did it several times in OpenFirmware:
Code: [Select]
dev /
13fff encode-int " AAPL,debug" property
boot cd:,\\:tbxi
There is a universal image of the community in the dvd-drive.

Mac OS was booted with bus errors:
 

But after the computer stood overnight in sleep mode in OS X 10.4, the boot of Mac OS 9 broke down again, and shows nothing but a gray screen.
Some suggest that can start kernel booting debug mode through OpenFirmware, and then it may become clear what is wrong with this computer.

How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Last Edit: July 04, 2022, 05:22:29 AM by V.Yakob »

Offline V.Yakob

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2022, 05:20:29 AM »
Some of my experiments led me to NanoKernel Log

Code: [Select]
dev /
3013fff encode-int " AAPL,debug" property
boot cd:,\\:tbxi



That's where the MDD stops and nothing can be done. Only turn off by holding the power button. I don't see any obvious mistakes here.
Does anyone have experience in reading these debug messages?
« Last Edit: July 04, 2022, 07:37:56 AM by V.Yakob »

Offline darthnVader

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2022, 08:05:36 AM »
If this is the Mac you have?

https://everymac.com/systems/apple/powermac_g4/specs/powermac_g4_1.25_mdd.html

That was sold specifically to support OS 9 booting, tho there may have been models that didn't support OS 9 such as education models.

Try and do a telnet session into open firmware or just get us an picture of the screen:

Code: [Select]
dev / .properties

Offline darthnVader

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2022, 08:22:17 AM »
Here are the machine specific disks for your 2003 MDD, they include the Apple Hardware Test so you can rule out a hardware issue:

http://macos9lives.com/smforum/index.php?topic=3266.0

« Last Edit: July 06, 2022, 08:35:01 AM by darthnVader »

Offline darthnVader

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2022, 09:30:49 AM »
Quote
About Apple Hardware Test
Apple Hardware Test diagnoses and detects problems with your computer's internal hardware components, such as the logic board, memory, modem, video RAM, and AirPort card. It does not check external hardware components, such as USB devices or FireWire devices, and it does not check non- Apple devices, such as PCI cards from other vendors.
Apple Hardware Test also does not check for operating system (OS) or other software-related problems, such as application or extension conflicts.
Apple Hardware Test for Power Mac Version 2.0.2 is distributed with Apple Power Mac computers introduced in 2003 only. It does not work with other computers.
Using Apple Hardware Test
Before using Apple Hardware Test, disconnect all external devices except the Apple keyboard, mouse, display, and speakers. Remove any non-Apple cards, such as PCI or AGP cards, that were not included in the original configuration of your computer. You should also disconnect the Ethernet network cable.
1. Restart your computer from the Software Install and Restore DVD (the disc that should currently be in the optical drive).
2. Hold down the Option key until a list of available bootable devices appears.
3. Select Apple Hardware Test and click the right arrow. The Loading icon then appears. Loading takes about 45 seconds.
4. When the Apple Hardware Test main screen appears, follow the onscreen instructions.
If your computer has a hardware problem, Apple Hardware Test can help identify the problem. If Apple Hardware Test detects a problem, it displays an error code. Make a note of the error code before pursuing support options. If Apple Hardware Test does not detect a hardware failure, the problem may be software related.
Known Issues
You cannot use Apple Hardware Test when a mouse is connected to the USB port on the computer. Connect the mouse to a USB keyboard if one is available.
If your Power Mac has more than 512 MB of RAM, the Extended Test may take significantly more time than indicated on the screen.
Your Power Mac can use memory modules or DIMMs even when the Power On Self-Test, which is run when you turn the machine on, detects part of a module as being bad. When you start up your computer, Apple Hardware Test reports failed memory modules in the Hardware Tests panel.
 While the video RAM is being tested, the screen may appear blank or appear to be turned off for extended periods of time, depending on how much video RAM is installed. This is normal.
When you click the Restart/Shutdown button in Apple Hardware Test, the Software Install and Restore DVD is not ejected. Either manually eject the DVD or use Mac OS to eject the DVD.
If your Power Mac has an ATTO Ultra SCSI PCI card installed, it takes approximately 1 to 2 minutes for Apple Hardware Test to start up because Apple Hardware Test is scanning the card for SCSI devices attached to the computer.
Recommendations
Apple Hardware Test is one of several tools and procedures you can use to resolve problems. Here are some steps that may help you resolve problems. Please back up your data before you perform any of these steps.
1. Turn the computer off and on properly.
You can often eliminate problems by turning off your computer as recommended. To turn off your computer, choose Shut Down from the Apple () menu. Do not turn off the computer by turning off the switch on a power strip or by pulling the computer’s power plug. Restart your computer by pressing the power button.
To restart your computer when it is on, choose Restart from the Apple () menu.
2. Check cables, peripherals, and controls.
To see if cables or peripherals are causing conflicts with your system, shut down your computer. Disconnect the cables and peripherals, such as printers, scanners, cameras and external mass storage devices. Then reconnect the cables and peripherals and restart your system. You can also adjust the controls on your monitors and other peripherals.
3. Start up from the Software Install and Restore DVD that came with your computer.
Start your system from the Software Install and Restore DVD (the disc that should currently be in the optical drive) by holding down the C key until you see the Apple logo. If the system works properly when started (booted) from the Software Install and Restore DVD, the problem may relate to the software installed on your computer.
4. Start Apple Hardware Test from the Software Install and Restore DVD and run the Quick and Extended Tests.
If the system does not work properly when you start from the Software Install and Restore DVD, the problem may relate to your computer's hardware components.
You can start up your computer with Apple Hardware Test on the Software Install and Restore DVD even if it will not start up in the Mac OS. If Apple Hardware Test passes both the Quick Test and the Extended Test, the problem may be software related. If Apple Hardware Test detects a problem, make a note of the error code and contact Apple. (See step 7.)
5. Refer to Mac Help and the Internet for assistance.
Mac Help, located in the Help menu, includes a wealth of technical information. The AppleCare Knowledge Base and other resources for technical help and support are available 24 hours a day at www.apple.com/support.
6. Reinstall the Mac OS.
In many cases, a clean installation of the Mac OS fixes recurring problems. Make sure you back up data on your hard drive before reinstalling. Then follow the instructions in your Power Mac Setup Guide or on the Software Install and Restore DVD to reinstall the Mac OS.

7. Contact AppleCare Service and Support for assistance.
If these steps don’t resolve the problem, please review the service and support material that came your computer for information about how to contact AppleCare for assistance.
Copyright 2000-2003 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, AirPort, FireWire, Mac, Macintosh, and Power Mac are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. AppleCare is a service mark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.
May 2003

Offline FBz

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2022, 10:45:58 AM »
Hey Darth,

Most everything you have asked has already been covered here in this other thread… http://macos9lives.com/smforum/index.php/topic,6335.msg47377.html#msg47377 AHT 2.0.2 and the Apple Service Diagnostic (691-4769) has also been employed.

IF it was feasible for V. Yakob to simply change out his mobo (as GaryN and others have previously suggested) this would have been done quite a long time ago. Currently Vitaly is seeking info on how to run the debugger in the OS 9 nanoKernel as per: “OS 9 nanoKernel has a debugger that can be set with the AAPL,debug property, but very few people know how to use it.”

Thanks.

Offline darthnVader

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2022, 11:57:55 AM »
Ok, I didn't know about the other thread, but I'd still like to get a look at the .properties of dev /.

Offline darthnVader

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2022, 12:12:14 PM »
MacTracker says the the 2003 MDD came with either a 7455 v2.1 or a 7455B v3.3, that could be an issue we'll just have to see.

They built it form June 2003-June 2004 so there may have been some special production run change that it doesn't support booting OS 9 native, or there is some underlaying hardware issue that just isn't showing up in the AHT or OS X.

What we are looking for is a .property in dev / to see if it is "MacRISC3'?

Offline darthnVader

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2022, 12:25:52 PM »
We really need Elliot to chime in on this, I'll email him once we have all the info and see if he has time to help us debug this.

I would start with the OS 9 General.DMG from the 2003 MDD restore set and strip it down to only three things( System Suitcase, Mac OS ROM, and the Finder ) Those should be the only three files needed to boot in a blessed System Folder.......

Offline FBz

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Re: How to enable debugging mode when booting the kernel in Mac OS 9?
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2022, 03:08:36 PM »
Looks like a 7455B... ;)

 


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