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Extensions, Control Panels, and General Tweaks for a Mac OS 9 D.A.W.

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IIO:
i go contrary: leave everything in. :)

most extensions just patch the system, they dont use any CPU cycles, and the RAM they use is minimal.

of course i agree with the list given above (software update and modem drivers is really not something one would need today), but the biggest handbrake at startup is something else: the apple menu!
so, general rule: dont put bigger archives with thousands of items (for example complete harddisks) into your applemenu. if you want to have something like that, use some third party menu which does not scan the files live at startup.

what can also help (and all of this has probably been discussed already somewhere here):
  use a modern SSD as boot drive
  use a smaller partition with more or less only the OS9 system folder on it
  use the startup doubler controlpanel

p.s. i also agree about disabling any energy saving shit including the default software by apple. (for audio work, that is. for a file server which runs 24/7 i would turn it on even in OS9.) energy saving can cause a lot of trouble especially with CRT monitors, SATA controllers, or certain software.

DieHard:

--- Quote ---most extensions just patch the system, they dont use any CPU cycles, and the RAM they use is minimal.

--- End quote ---

Well, that is true, however the main reason is not to tweek just so save a tiny bit of RAM... remember OS 9 does NOT utilize memory protection and when you load all the extensions you have, this will multiple exponentially your chances of having extensions conflict and either not load or crash the system; you can trouble shoot this scenario, but we are trying to keep the newbies up and running easily, if they load everything they may decide to scrap OS 9 before they even get a chance to use it, when frustration sets in... lastly, things like the hard drive indexing and ruining a multi-track DAW session is a nightmare.


--- Quote ---but the biggest handbrake at startup is something else: the apple menu!
--- End quote ---
Newbies can explore other menus / system utilities after they get going (I like Action Go-mac)


--- Quote ---so, general rule: dont put bigger archives with thousands of items (for example complete harddisks) into your applemenu. if you want to have something like that, use some third party menu which does not scan the files live at startup.

--- End quote ---

Again, I really like Go-Mac,, you can check or uncheck all preferences, like "Drives" and other preferences


--- Quote ---use a smaller partition with more or less only the OS9 system folder on it
--- End quote ---
Yes and remember to copy the System folder to at least 1 other volume so you can boot to that volume also, this provides the means to maintain and repair your default system volume

IIO:

i concur, if our goal is to assemble the ultimate audio OS9, everything not needed for that purpose should not be included, and if it is only for the sake of our perfectionism.

but my personal installs looks a bit different, they are in use for some other things, too.

once i stood in a place with a system with no appletalk, serial switcher, and stuff it engine and was really f*cked. since that day i gave up to "optimise" by deleting .

DieHard:
Well let's not "delete"... the beauty of Mac OS 9 is the ability to have many different "extensions sets"

Just so the Newbies understand, you can have different sets that simple "turn off" the extensions that you do not need for your current workflow; save the set as a different name, and reboot.... for musicians the very basic mode would be 2 sets to choose from, "DAW Mode" with the tweeks mentioned above and "Non-DAW mode" maybe with almost all extensions turned on.

IIO:
sets ... nah ... better ... 2 different system folders. :)

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