Author Topic: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?  (Read 891 times)

Online macStuff

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anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« on: May 12, 2019, 12:56:54 PM »
looking for someone who can help me achieve a hack for the Ikea Jerker desk to be able to add new shelves
using a 3d printed bracket to attach a new wood shelf cut to size; to attach to the side of the jerker desk/post
via an M6 bolt and then attach to the underside'/center of the shelf via wood screws



i have zero experience with 3d modelling (well since the 1990s)
im really surprised someoen else hasnt done this already theres lots of "ikea jerker" 3d models for other purposes to download
but noone has done the obvious shelf replacement bracket that im looking to get made

i have 4 of these ikea jerker desks, the can take 8mm metric casters on the bottom to make them rollable around the studio aswell
so its well worth the effort

if you arent familiar with the discontinued desk from ikea see here:
http://www.oldschooldaw.com/forums/index.php/topic,6285.msg8517.html#msg8517
they can still be bought second hand all over via craigslist/kijiji/etc


basic measurements :
6.1cm wide
1.7cm tall
7.5cm deep/length

jerker-attach hole locations:
#1 :edge of m6 bolt hole starts 6mm from left, 5mm from top, 8mm from btm
#2 :edge of m6 bolt hole starts 6mm from right, 5mm from top, 8mm from btm

shelf-attach hole locations:
#1: 5.3cm from jerker-attach side; 1.2cm from edge
#2: 5.3cm frm jerker-attach side; 1.2cm frm edge

heres some of the useful/usless other models that can be found for the desk:
https://www.yeggi.com/q/ikea+jerker/
(im still surprised noones made the obvious simple bracket to add shelves to the desk)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 02:18:24 PM by macStuff »

Online macStuff

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2019, 01:51:31 PM »
apparently there are resources to allow adding the proper metric threading to the hole
so you dont have to make the hole smaller and then tap the threading in yourself per hole (time-saver!)
http://www.goengineer.com/2013/12/27/3d-printer-tricks-quick-threaded-holes/3d-printing/3d-design/
http://blog.stratasys.com/2012/03/12/incorporating-screw-threads-into-fused-deposition-modeling-parts/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nhcKn7Kt8w

ive attached a simple view of the old design + my new proposed idea that would attach with two peices on etither side rather than a long bar
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 05:34:05 PM by macStuff »

Offline FdB

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2019, 10:21:04 AM »
Suggestion:


If the composition of your shelving material is sufficient enough to support the load/weight of what ever you intend to place on it… so that you could eliminate the (yellow) “X” portion of the cross-member support for the shelf, why not simply use wood to replace that entire cross-member? Easy enough to rip a piece of lumber to that same “Y” dimension and then affix your shelving material to that new wooden cross-member, much as the original shelf was affixed to the original cross-member… using wood(?) screws and glue? This would retain and possibly increase torsional rigidity and possibly, also increase load bearing.

Also considering possible, higher-than-planned weight on that new shelf, you could also slightly increase the A & B dimensions of the new wooden cross-member and then substitute “replacement” wood screws (near the same diameter as those shown in the illustration as part number 110090) to affix the shelf and the new cross-member in place.

Or, you can wait for someone to “tool-up” a 3-D version of your design. With the reduced horizontal / lateral support inherent in your design, as your shelf is wood… ya might end up with a bowed shelf under actual load.
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Online macStuff

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2019, 10:29:45 AM »
the shelf itself is about 3/4" inch thick
its strong enough to hold the basic doo-dads + shoe boxes full of junk + books etc that i want to put on it
if i put something extremely heavy then maybe it would bend but i doubt it.. try and bend a 3/4" piece of wood.. u would have to put like ; i dunno; 100-200 lbs on it to bend it? wouldnt you?

but the idea isnt about "1" shelf - its about being able to make 3-6-9-however many i need; shelves by easily 3d printing the piece + gettin the bolts + screws + wood + boom! instant shelf

i did think about using other materials but that would require me to use a tap for each m6 bolt thread hole = lots of work

really the only important part is the location of the m6 bolt holes - the wood screws can go in anywhere on the shelf plank using 1/2" wood screws

so my idea is just to have a small 7cm x 7cm block that has the metric m6 bolt threads built into the design in 3d design program; and then recessed holes to allow for the wood screws to go into the shelf; if it works theres thousands of people still using these desks and the design could become very well used + implemented

this metal peice was always the worst part of the design of the desk as the little metal 4mm peice of sheet metal that actually has teh threads wobbles around in its place and makes the shelf make a noise, and teeter back + forth wobbling; probably a big part of the reason why the desk was discontinued back in late 2000s by IKEA

check this out:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2787344 this guy made a full on VESA montior mount; i dont care for this pproach as i use my own ergotron monitor stands that i prefer for flexibilities sake; and ease of use/moving them around etc... he stabilized his with an aluminum square bar; i also dont care for his design because its too big to make exponentially a bunch of them,  the less materials needed the better right? to be able to make more shelves with the same amount of 3d print filament/material whatever they call it



« Last Edit: May 13, 2019, 10:47:19 AM by macStuff »

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2019, 04:46:17 PM »
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3628422
someone helped me design this
im tryign to get it 3d printed
it says it will take 3 hours to print
but once its printed x2 ill be able to screw this into my shelf and then bolt the shelf to the desk frame
using an m6 bolt + nut

hes trying to update the design to include m6 threads int he bolt holes


Offline GaryN

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2019, 08:00:53 PM »
the shelf itself is about 3/4" inch thick
its strong enough to hold the basic doo-dads + shoe boxes full of junk + books etc that i want to put on it
if i put something extremely heavy then maybe it would bend but i doubt it.. try and bend a 3/4" piece of wood.. u would have to put like ; i dunno; 100-200 lbs on it to bend it? wouldn't you?
The only thing to keep in mind about heavy stuff, macStuff, (yuk yuk) is that the wood will not necessarily bend today, but with a lot of weight on it, it will sag over time. The downward force is also transferred to the verticals, trying to pull them inward. Not a huge deal but holding a heavy monitor or such may require you to at least brace the entire length with a piece of right-angle steel along the edge or add a vertical center support in back.

Online macStuff

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2019, 09:56:23 PM »
i got another random local guy who answered my post on fb printing the brackets for me tomorrow - will be doing testing obviously to see how much weight i can put before it breaks lol
should be fun

also - if the sizing is correct + it works then i can look at ordering 3d prints with stronger materials

there was another guy who did a design with a crossbar of aluminum;
but yea i dont plan to put monitors on the shelves. just books + desk clutter crap; lightweight junk that would otherwise clutter my desk. and or boxes, shoe boxes full of junk etc;
anyway we will see how much it can hold; when we test it out; i got another guy helping me with it. random strangers ftw

tbh im more worried about the bracket breaking then the shelf sagging; like i said the shelf is pretty solid

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/aw-extra-3614-stronger-shelves/

i put the numbers thru the 'Sagulator' lol
https://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/
47 inches length the shelf is. by about 10-12 wide and like i said 3/4" thick
it says it should support about 58lbs without sagging;
err wait maybe thats 58lbs per foot? so if its 47 inches, thats almost 4 ft;
so it should support 58 x 3.9 ? = 225 lbs approx
perfect i weight about 10 lbs under that so ill just sit on it to test :D lol
« Last Edit: May 14, 2019, 10:18:08 PM by macStuff »

Online macStuff

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2019, 06:02:41 AM »
i was the library last night and some of the plastic that they use for the 3d printing is actually pretty strong;
they were making functional bits with it like hinges + brackets etc
anyway i have zero experience thus far; looking forward to getting into this;
ive been warned it can be addictive

Online macStuff

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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2019, 02:30:06 PM »
just got sent preview pics of the first print!

someone had the idea of inserting a piece of metal with the m6 threads on it - now that i think of it thats actualy a pretty decent idea. but complicates it further in that id have to somehow get metal pieces and get them tapped at just the right size not practical but def would be stronger
« Last Edit: May 15, 2019, 05:25:13 PM by macStuff »

Offline FdB

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Re: 3d print model?
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2019, 07:43:22 AM »
Real world results?

Any update(s) on just how this project turned out?
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Re: anyone have experience with 3d print model design?
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2019, 02:36:26 PM »
turned out good; the shelf hasnt broke yet but im not really testing for the upper limit but i have computer sitting on top of my top shelf on my desk;
they work well !! i have 2 shelves put up so far with another bracket sitting waiting to test; i was supposed to use one set to find out how heavy it could go but i guess i didnt want to break it;