Author Topic: AcBel 360W PSU Project  (Read 399 times)

Offline Fury deBongo

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AcBel 360W PSU Project
« on: November 30, 2017, 11:04:05 AM »
ReUseTek in Tustin California (for the $40.00 AcBel PSU), turned out to be a dead end. “No stock, and not expecting any, soon”. File under “offer too good to be true”.

Currently closing in on the final shopping list for the “Terrible Twelve” Kapacitors… necessary for the rudimentary “shotgun” replace/repair approach on the MDD AcBel 360w PSU. Digi-Key and Mouser totals are running right at a whopping $7.41 (before shipping). The TTK shopping list will now travel to a local electronic supply source for comparison pricing and availability.

I don’t even want to think about the dreaded Samsung PSUs yet.

Also, acquired another MDD with a 400W power supply, thinking that I might finally experience the true Wind Tunnel decibel levels… but it’s just as quiet as my other MDDs. I feel robbed. Maybe the fans aren’t working? (I’m pushing this AcBel PSU project, or I’d investigate further.)

Many preliminary thanks to Buz, Uffda Oi, and especially Toasty… over at Badcaps.net for all their blood, sweat and tears… pics, spreadsheet data and schematic “locator” map(s). All of which I hope to eventually share here (or conveniently blogged elsewhere), once I’m finished with this initial foray into this realm.

I know... capacitor is spelled with a “c”;)
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Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2017, 11:42:01 PM »
Hosanna!

Caps from Mouser arrived earlier this evening and I removed 10 remaining caps (of the total 12 that I had slated). Then, soldered in the 12 and jumpered the PSU at the MOBO plug and the PSU fired right up! (It's still quietly running here on the bench.) Hopefully I'll have time to re-install it into an MDD tomorrow AND by the end of the week... provide pics, etcetera. Think I'd like to try 2 more AcBels before attempting a Samsung PSU.

No sparks, no arcs and no stink. AND no more cheap-cheesy TEAPO capacitors.

So, yes... 'tis indeed possible!

(When I think of all the failed PSUs that were just simply discarded...)   
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Offline DieHard

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2017, 08:23:01 AM »
This is indeed awesome... most mac owners dream of going this deep... but in the end, they come up short on effort and give up... thus, they never enjoy the fruits of victory !  You saw, you conquered, you triumphed :)

PS:  I'll be sending you a few more to do...lol

Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2017, 10:19:38 AM »
Aww shucks, ‘tweren’t nuthin. ;)
But, it was soooo very gratifying when it powered up… as opposed to just sitting there quietly, not working.

Wouldn’t mind a couple more AcBels and maybe one Samsung to “task me” (perhaps like Ahab’s white whale).
How many can you get in one of those “Large Flat Rate Boxes? Ha-ha!

This morning I am thinking about the fans and the now near-mythical Verax fan replacements.
(Don’t believe they’re available anymore. A bit pricey, even back in 2007 anyway.)
Also have seen mentioned somewhere, that these original fans can be lubricated… yet I believe this untrue / ill-advised.
Surely there are now some other, inexpensive, “new and improved” varieties to replace the original 2410ML-04W-B60 fans? ???
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Offline MacOS Plus

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2017, 11:55:56 AM »
  I'd like to know if there are fan substitutes just from the standpoint that they will fail eventually.  I've lubricated old fans in a pinch but found that the oil would dry out and get sticky too quickly.

  You've given me hope for the restoration of my one failed AcBel power supply, plus some confidence my working ones aren't necessarily a 'terminal' time-bomb!

Offline mrhappy

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 06:20:40 AM »
Nice work and congrats Fury!! This is indeed good news! ;D

Offline DieHard

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 08:34:22 AM »
  I'd like to know if there are fan substitutes just from the standpoint that they will fail eventually.  I've lubricated old fans in a pinch but found that the oil would dry out and get sticky too quickly.

Yes, unfortunately, some PC/Mac/Electronic fans with totally gum-up "sticky" with things like WD40, an extremely light machine oil like "Sewing Machine" oil is the best choice and... the "less is more" approach is key, do NOT use more than an extremely small drop.  Also, research the type of fan, if it is a "Sleeve Bearing" type, consider just replacing it (unless you are on a budget, then you can give the "oiling" a try). Sleeve Bearing fans tend to die sudden and if it is in need of oil, it is probably on the way out. "Ball Bearing" Fans older than 2 years, usually will last a lot longer, if lubricated every 2 years,  Ball Bearing fans have tight tolerance casings so give the oil 30 min to penetrate before wiping off ans excess,  you can youtube a good procedure... always remove the fan and leave it horizontal when oiling.  Lastly, if the fan is a "Fluid Dynamic" or "Hydro Dynamic" type and it starts to fail, replace it as these cannot be successfully oiled by humans.

Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2017, 09:56:44 AM »
Thanks again DieHard for the splendid info… and muchas gracias to Señor Happy & MacOS Plus.

Plundering Urdvurk’s “MDD silencing thread” here again… geforceg4 & joetramp mention both Everflow and Fractal fans as possible PSU replacement fans. The Fractal fans are interesting…

Reopened PSU to check fan ID. NMB-MATT (Minebea Motor), ball bearing variety… 2410ML-04W-B60. [23.3 cfm, 35dba, 4900rpm, 3.6W. 0.300A]

Mouser (http://www.mouser.com), has a NEW  60x60x25mm “omniCOOL” fan from CUI inc. (CFM-6025V-152-312), rated at 27cfm, 5200rpm, 31.2dba, 1.8W, 0.152A and a 70,000 hour life expectancy… for $6.00 each. So… faster, quieter, move more air, less power consumption AND less expensive. Sounds too good to be true. Check for the larger main fan too?

May order a pair of the small CUI fans… along with the necessary capacitors for the next PSU.
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Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 09:55:12 PM »
Someday I'll figure out the text-pic-text-pic-text pic... ritual. Cheers!
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 09:40:25 AM by Fury deBongo »
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Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2017, 11:46:11 PM »
I don’t honestly deserve any real credit for this project. In fact, anyone can arrive at the same result by reading from the following sources: (1). Japamacs [see web address below], (2). BadCaps.net [specific thread address also way below], AND (3). from utilizing the image files attached to the above post. Not to forget Andy Cuffe’s initial positive comments concerning the re-cap possibility effort in the first place. Good guy, that Andy.

The true credit for all of this, goes primarily to Toasty over @ BadCaps.net and good ol’ Buz from way back in 2006… when both those guys started the AcBel PSU “shotgun surgery” thread. I bet that I’ve read it at least ten times (and continue to refer back to it), and if you’re seriously considering this “shotgun approach” I strongly suggest that you visit there and read it too… several times. Toasty seems to have the patience of Job. (Biblical reference there.) Read the BadCaps thread beginning with Buz’s post (noted way down at the bottom here).

None of it is really all that difficult. It just requires time and patience… and some “other stuff” too. AND not getting your pants shocked-off. IF your PSU is only recently “suspect” and it’s still in your machine, you may wish to check out the following from 2009 first: http://www.jcsenterprises.com/Japamacs_Page/Blog/D275729F-09DA-4FBB-96B3-BEEEB2C04619.html Otherwise, proceed…

The MAP jpg shows the basic layout of the board and details the (12) capacitors that were removed and replaced. (Caps noted with darker green dots.) The lighter, yellow-green dotted capacitors AND the blue-dotted capacitors were not R&R’ed. BUT, IF this “replace 12 capacitors” effort doesn’t cure your PSU… you may need to know the locations of these others. Let’s hope not.

The BackMap jpg was created to make it much easier than flipping the board back and forth trying to ascertain just where the solder points might be for the capacitors to be removed and then replaced. (This image could be a little smaller.) Hopefully, the back of your AcBel board will look exactly the same.

YOU must now be WARNED, these PSUs and their capacitors will maintain an electrical charge for quite some time, especially after just being unplugged. I’ve heard “wait for 48 hours” to allow the charge to bleed off / dissipate (I’d wait much longer)… and the PSU that I re-capped had probably been sitting around for a year or more. I still shorted out the two legs of each capacitor on the back of the board before doing anything because… YOU CAN DIE! With that in mind, you proceed at your own risk. Me, MacOS9Lives, nor anyone associated with the aforementioned, OR anyone over at BadCaps.net… shall be liable in any way… should you shock your pants off and/or DIE while attempting this procedure. So there. Proceed only at your own risk.

Had a 30 Watt soldering iron, but I bought a 50 Watt-er for this project… and wish I’d gotten an even hotter one. I used 60/40 flux-core solder (.032 Diameter) and Chemtronics Size #3 Soder-Wick to remove the melted solder. (I’ve got one of those spring-loaded solder-suckers too and I’ve always hated it.) Also, wearing an Opti-Visor magnifier is a necessity unless you’ve some desktop flexible-neck jeweler’s magnifier handy (or you have Superman’s super vision capabilities). A sharp X-Acto knife is also very highly recommended. #11 blade (and a #17 blade and/or a #18 blade, is also nice).

After you get the PSU removed and its’ case opened, the first hurdle is removing the female power plug insert from the PSU case. Unscrew the green striped ground wire from the case and move it all out of your way. When you try to desolder the brown and blue wires from the female plug lugs, you just might accidentally heat the ground wire more than you should (like I did, but not too bad). Then you’ve got to compress the “wings” on both sides of this female plug insert, in order to push it out of the case*… in order that you may eventually remove the main PSU board from the case. Someone did insist that you can do all of this without removing the female plug insert (good luck with that).

*Trimmed wooden chopsticks work fairly well with practice. Or, long thin screwdrivers. You’ll see. Be patient.

Now, you can carefully cut the small zip tie that holds all the wires entering the case in place on the case. Then carefully (very carefully), remove the (2) fan plugs from the attached Fan Control board and then you can remove the fans… before removing the (4) screws holding the main PSU board in the case. Now, you can take out the main board with the small Fan Control board attached and begin your close inspection of the main board, looking for evidence of burnt/shorted/melted connections/tracks, etcetera. Remember… can still have juice present. A little flashlight is nice to shine in, under and around on the board, inspecting.

Mine didn’t have any “flash” trace or other electrical-short/burn evidence. I did see two bulged/swollen TEAPO capacitors (C29 and C60), their tops looked like small domes as opposed to a nice round flat-top surface. AND, they don’t always dome, bulge or swell when they fail. After removing the (12), I found some other bad ones with my diminished-capacity, digital multi-meter. (No, didn’t buy a new DMM for this, OR an ESR meter to test the capacitors while still soldered on the board.) At $13.50 total for the caps and shipping for this little adventure, it was go-cheap or go-home.

The MAP jpg image provides a clear location view of the caps, without the true overhang of Heatsink 2. Don’t need to remove the heatsink to get at the caps (unlike the Samsung PSUs where a heatsink and attached mosfet(s) must be removed). You’ll understand this, once you get your AcBel PSU open. And maybe I’ll tackle a Samsung later.

Goop vs. Glop. The next BIG hurdle is all the “white-goop-stuff” (technical term there), that was applied during manufacture in order to keep the caps from “singing”… as I suppose the “mighty fans” blow over, around and through them. This is where the X-Acto knife is necessary. (I cheated and had a second X-Acto #17 or #18 bladed knife with that squared blade that I simply pushed down through some of the goop.) Get C29 and C60 out and you can address the remainder of most of this goop a little easier. C16 also is a good place to begin on that cluster of caps. (Very careful around C16 as it’s gooped to the nearby bundle of wires. After all the new caps are back in, I think Toasty @ BadCaps recommended using silicone glue-glop in place of the white goop. I used very little, just in case I needed to get back in there… AND I prefer a bit more “mighty wind” around and through my caps for dat chill.

So, there you have it… easy as π. Caps out & caps in! You can get a very detailed, extensive rundown thread on most all of this over @ BadCaps.net (https://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14077). Once I had the AcBel open, it made a lot more sense after reading through the BadCaps thread about seven or eight more times. You might also need a “map” of the PSU’s MOBO plug in order to “jumper” test (and other voltage output tests / PSU diagnoses), should the PSU not function properly after this shotgun surgery approach. (There’s a good one on the Japamacs web site noted here at the beginning of this diatribe.) I’ve also attached my Mouser capacitor shopping List jpg here with the individual capacitor physical dimensions… should you wish to shop somewhere other than Mouser. (www.mouser.com) Or, use completely different capacitors from another manufacturer.

P.S. Andy in Austin (acuffe@gmail.com), stated at some point that he won’t work on PSUs that someone has already “fiddled with”. So, honestly assess your true soldering skills before possibly wrecking a PSU any further… because Andy might not save your buggered PSU afterwards. Of course, it wasn’t working before you started on it, right?

So, there’s my 100th wordy post here. Thanks again to everyone mentioned herein… and thanks to you for taking the time to read all this gibberish.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 01:44:12 PM by Fury deBongo »
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Offline DieHard

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2017, 07:59:56 AM »
Quote
I don’t honestly deserve any real credit for this project. In fact, anyone can arrive at the same result by reading from the following sources: (1). Japamacs [see web address below], (2). BadCaps.net [specific thread address also way below], AND (3). from utilizing the image files attached to the above post. Not to forget Andy Cuffe’s initial positive comments concerning the re-cap possibility effort in the first place. Good guy, that Andy.

Yes, but you wrapped it all up in a neat little package, this will help many :)

Also, I think you are going to give Andy a run for his money

Offline GaryN

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2017, 08:59:58 PM »
Rock on Fury! Great work!

Goop vs. Glop. The next BIG hurdle is all the “white-goop-stuff” (technical term there), that was applied during manufacture in order to keep the caps from “singing”… as I suppose the “mighty fans” blow over, around and through them.
Actually, the goop is there for a very important reason. It is to help support the mass of the caps (especially the larger ones). Being in a tight space where they are subjected to repeated heat / cool cycles and constant vibration from the fans and HDDs day in and day out, they are virtually guaranteed to shake themselves loose and crack their solder connections without it. You should definitely replace it with a silicone-based (preferably non-conductive - duh) caulk after replacement.

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2017, 10:19:35 PM »
Having performed many capacitor and other component replacements myself over the years, primarily on PC motherboards, video cards and LCD monitor PCBs, I've learned a few tricks that should help anyone attempting this:

  Definitely you want a high-quality soldering iron.  After years of frustration with various cheapo consumer irons, I bit the bullet and purchased a professional, digitally controlled Weller model (WD1 base unit) which offers numerous tip profiles, three temperature preset buttons with very quick heating, and automatic timed shutdown to not prematurely roast your iron tips.  It has a stand to stow the iron in which the base unit detects the presence of to work in conjunction with the shut-down timer.  The stand has an integrated tip cleaner, and I also use a proper tip-tinning compound immediately after every tip cleaning to maintain and extend the life of the tips.

  Secondly, high quality solder wick is a must, and it should be kept in a sealed zip-lock bag as much as possible because oxidation will quick reduce its effectiveness otherwise.  Getting a narrower wick with a finer-guage braid wire will make it easier to apply to only the spot you want in tight quarters and be useful for a much wider range of repair work on dense computer PCBs and tiny components.

  Thirdly, many capacitors can be extremely difficult to remove safely due to being soldered into a large power plane within the PCB, which acts as a substantial heatsink.  Applying enough heat for enough duration in this situation can frequently ruin the solder pad and any surface tracings attached, and often the component lead still won't let go.  I have made extensive use of a product called "Chip-Quik" which is a special low-melting-temp alloy solder to avoid these problems.  Apply a liberal amount of flux and start heating the pad while applying some of the Chip-Quik alloy - it will start to mix with the existing solder and progressively lower the melting point of the wire joint as it blends through all the original solder.  The resultant blend also stays liquid longer without heat applied because the latent heat is still sufficient for the lowered melting point.  Remove as much of the mixed-solder residue as possible with wick and re-heat the remaining solder to remove the component with less heat and contact time required.  If wick will not clear all the solder from the PCB hole afterwards, use a micro drill bit in a handheld pin-vise to extract the rest of the solder.  The solder is very soft, so the drill bit should easily remove it without damaging the wall of the PCB hole or the solder pads.  As our friend FdB has attested to, solder vacuums can really suck, and not in a good way!  The method I've outlined should dramatically improve your rework experiences in difficult to heat areas.  I've used it to successfully replace voltage regulators of the type with the entire metal back soldered to the PCB, and also to remove and replace 160-pin PQFP PCI bus chips even (the AMCC PCI Matchmaker type found on the PTIII PCI and AMIII PCI cards).  Those monster PQFPs are crazy-scary to remove safely, but it's definitely doable this way without having to worry about investing in an expensive hot-air re-work unit and masking the component area sufficiently to not melt everything around it.  It was the re-soldering part on such a fine pin pitch that was the real PITA!

  Now despite what it sounds like, don't get any funny ideas of sending all your PSUs up here to the Great White North - I'm mostly a hobbyist when it comes to electronics repair!  I rarely even bother to repair computer power supplies since a failure is usually a sign of poor quality and likely further and more destructive cascade failures later even if it can be repaired once.  (You'll really kick yourself if you go to the effort to repair a failed PSU only to later have it fatally fry a motherboard and/or attached peripherals.)  My interest in attempting repair of my own MDD PSU is in the relative rarity and cost of replacement units versus your 'garden-variety' ATX type.  If it's just capacitors that are the issue then I have confidence in the relative safety of the repaired unit.  If it were any other components that went bad I'd likely scrap the whole thing as a precaution given my experiences with some ATX PSU failures.  (REALLY don't want to have to kick myself!)

  Truly many thanks to FdB for his efforts in obtaining/consolidating and actually testing this reference information - that PCB diagram is top-notch!  I'm going to order the necessary capacitors for my own failed 360W AcBel PSU, and I'll report back on the results when done.  Just one question for clarity - is the primary set of 12 capacitors the same for the 400W AcBel?  When I'm ordering capacitors I'd get enough to cover spares for my working 400W and working 360W if they share a common set.

Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2017, 11:09:55 AM »
Absolutely great post, MOS+. Adding Chip-Quik to my list here.

And a quick post concernning the 400W AcBel…

Pulled a working 400W and visually, the board seems identical. Without disassembly & pulling the caps, can’t say if individual ratings are all the same… however they do all appear similar in physical size/mfg. Added “bonus” for me is that C21 and C60 are domed and C60 also appears to have leaked.

Haven’ t really put this one to a full performance test but it does boot and run the MDD dual 867 MHz it came from and it also powered up an Apple Cinema Display. (Ten minutes or so, before I shut it down.) It also has Delta Electronics fans, so I question whether it’s original or from the Apple noise reduction re-work program.

I’ll put it in a faster machine later today and run it through the paces. If it fails, I may be able to provide better info after then pulling the caps.

Again, thanks for sharing. An absolutely great post… from the Great White North “PSU Sleeper Cell”.  ;)

Yes, perhaps a wall does need to be built… but by the Canadians… to keep US out.
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Offline MacOS Plus

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2017, 01:23:23 PM »
Absolutely great post, MOS+. Adding Chip-Quik to my list here.

And a quick post concernning the 400W AcBel…

Pulled a working 400W and visually, the board seems identical. Without disassembly & pulling the caps, can’t say if individual ratings are all the same… however they do all appear similar in physical size/mfg. Added “bonus” for me is that C21 and C60 are domed and C60 also appears to have leaked.

Haven’ t really put this one to a full performance test but it does boot and run the MDD dual 867 MHz it came from and it also powered up an Apple Cinema Display. (Ten minutes or so, before I shut it down.) It also has Delta Electronics fans, so I question whether it’s original or from the Apple noise reduction re-work program.

I’ll put it in a faster machine later today and run it through the paces. If it fails, I may be able to provide better info after then pulling the caps.

  Connecting an ACD via ADC (Really, why did they have to invent such confusingly similar acronyms in the same device?!?) is definitely a suitable torture-test.  Even with the old 1280x1024 LCD version I have it clearly stresses out the power supply because you can hear a difference in the speed of the fans.  If you don't wreck the PSU with that then I think its smooth sailing.  I worried enough about having the ADC monitor powered off my MDD, considering everything else it has to power, I 'switched it up' by connecting it through an external power supply.  It's actually a two-station KVM switch with DVI inputs, self-powered ADC output and USB.  Certainly saves space at that desk and it's an awesome rarity.

Quote
Again, thanks for sharing. An absolutely great post… from the Great White North “PSU Sleeper Cell”.  ;)

Yes, perhaps a wall does need to be built… but by the Canadians… to keep US out.

Uhhh, South Park?

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2017, 06:18:25 PM »
  I opened up my failed 360W AcBel for a fresh look.  C10 appears slightly swollen, and C60 maybe very slightly.  All others are visibly fine, but I'll replace the whole set of twelve anyway.

  Next up was to cross-check my spares against the 'shopping list'.  I have a rather large collection of new capacitors left over from past repair purchase lots, as well as salvaged good spares retrieved over the years from various devices that failed some other way and couldn't be repaired or weren't worth repairing.  I found exact physical size or close enough matches with correct ratings for seven out of the twelve to attack first:

C7 - 4 pcs
C8 - 2 pcs
C10 - 4 pcs
C21 - 1 pc
C43 - 6 pcs
C59/60 - 61 pcs (Told ya I had a lot!)

  So it looks like I'm well on my way!  BTW, once I got the grey adhesive removed from the component directly attached to the line plug and removed the fans, the board came fully out of the frame easily without detaching the line plug.  It's possible there were production variants where this wasn't possible, but in mine it was straightforward.

Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2017, 09:51:24 AM »
Seems that you’re well on your way with stock-on-hand. BadCaps AcBel thread, later notes C30, C32 and C45 as “alternate” possible additions to the (12)… from the “other” caps MAP listings. C8 = C32 [and you already have (2)]. Maybe worth a look, while you’ve got it open.

And yes, that whole Apple proprietary, ADC thing suggested to me, more of a business model / marketing stunt than an actual user-advantage benefit. “Hey, we can sell more of our “own” monitors and increase our market share.”

Tried to force failure on the 400W AcBel last night but no dice. (And that… with C60 visibly bulged and previously having leaked fluid, in evidence.) PM me should your 400W ever fail and I’ll do the same, if and when mine falters. Then, we’ll adjust the “cap list” for the 400W, if necessary.

Images of KVM switch with DVI inputs with ADC and USB?

Hadn’t seen the South Park episode “Where My Country Gone” until watching snippets last night. (I’ll look for full-episode source.) Thanks.
My “PSU Sleeper Cell” comment refers to others “out there” that may know a great deal about this process, but have yet to share/post here.

“We know you’re out there, with rage in your eyes and your megaphone…” ;D

Surely, somewhere, after all this time, the original AcBel PSU schematic diagram exists AND someone has a copy? Please share.
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Offline DieHard

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2017, 08:33:33 AM »
Quote
And yes, that whole Apple proprietary, ADC thing suggested to me, more of a business model / marketing stunt than an actual user-advantage benefit. “Hey, we can sell more of our “own” monitors and increase our market share.”

I have different theory... many "Jobs" era innovations were based on Art, Style, and mystery.. not "stunts".  I clearly remember the conscious decision of Apple to want to "amaze" the consumer with their product.  As a precursor to ADC, I remember a rare G3 Studio display monitor (oh yeah, I have one in the back, see pics) with integrated ADB and S-Video Ports. This really blew people's minds, back in 1999
https://everymac.com/monitors/apple/studio_cinema/specs/apple_studio_display_blue.html

I mean, for customers, it was like...
Quote
WTF, how are the S-Video, Audio, and Composite Video ports on the back of the monitor working with no cable mess from the computer ?

Now with ADC, it was the next obvious step... power the monitor with 'PFM" (Pure Fuckin' Magic).  This was NOT, let's sell more monitors via a propriety connector... this was...let's sell more PFM monitors that will amaze the client, and they are so dumb-founded they will think we have developed Tesla technology... an Apple monitor needs NO Power cord at all... just a signal from the video card... in addition, was have added "wireless USB" technology, lol, where you get PFM USB ports that carry your USB from your mac magically, of course, and lastly, you can turn the Mac on via the monitor with the PFM power up button.

This whole scheme was marketing, yes, but it was marketing by providing technology that not only "looked" cool, but functioned with Apple secret magic dust.  So you could charge 4X more for stuff that really wasn't necessarily better than competitor's products as far as specifications, but kicked ass in the user functions, convenience, and aesthetics.  No cable mess and monitors that ran without a power plug while looking like thy came off the Start trek enterprise.

I remember a demo in my store of a G4 Tower with and ADC monitor, I would waive my left hand about a foot away from the monitor (while I discretely hit the power button with my right hand) and I would say loudly, "Authorization code Alpha, power on" as it chimed and started to boot, I would fuck with people and say it was "Voice Power-on activated"  a great ice breaker to sell a computer that costs about 5X more than an IBM PC compatible...lol... I am such clown.

Offline MacOS Plus

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2017, 09:15:52 AM »
  While I don't care for the 'gimmicks', I do actually like the overall look of that monitor.  I'd never seen that model before.  Certainly a far more practical design than the later 'easel-legged' ADC LCDs, and also better because it's not ADC powered - Wasn't it widely accepted that ADC-powered monitors contributed to the excessive failure rate of the MDD power supplies?  (Not just crap components.)

  BTW, take great care bending that crushed VGA pin back to shape! ;)

Offline Fury deBongo

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Re: AcBel 360W PSU Project
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2017, 09:59:56 AM »
Perhaps in haste to provide the info, the original MAP.jpg noted incorrect spec info for C7. Now corrected to read C7 - 220µF / 35V. Ordering, or cross-referencing for similar replacement capacitors from the LIST.jpg would have provided correct replacements anyway, but I apologize for any problems that this initial error may have caused.

In other not-so-good news... my second AcBel PS repair attempt has failed. (So, out it will come for further investigation, two days from now.) :'(
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