Classic Mac OS Software (Discussions on Applications) > Hacking the System, Mac OS 9.3, and Beyond !

The Trampoline (Inside booting the Mac with a microscope)

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MacOS Plus:

--- Quote from: nanopico on May 26, 2016, 07:45:50 PM ---The only thing I don't understand yet is
A). What order do all the managers actually start in, I know pretty good some groups of them but I need to figure out the exact order (not that it's super important, but my brain needs to know).
B). How it determines the order to load extensions and control panels.

--- End quote ---

  From what I remember about extension loading sequence, first there is a preferential file type property that can be set to make an extension load ahead of the default file type, after which everything else loads in alphabetical order.  Users would often insert a space at the front of an extension's filename in order to force it to the front of the alphabetical queue.  I can't remember the alternate file type off the top of my head, but I have changed it on some of my extensions in the past when inserting a space in the filename wasn't sufficient to give it first priority (usually CPU upgrade extensions where the vendor hadn't changed it themselves already, and also Medianet).  I'm fairly certain the control panels load after the extensions, again in alphabetical order.

nanopico:

--- Quote from: MacOS Plus on May 26, 2016, 09:04:39 PM ---
--- Quote from: nanopico on May 26, 2016, 07:45:50 PM ---The only thing I don't understand yet is
A). What order do all the managers actually start in, I know pretty good some groups of them but I need to figure out the exact order (not that it's super important, but my brain needs to know).
B). How it determines the order to load extensions and control panels.

--- End quote ---

  From what I remember about extension loading sequence, first there is a preferential file type property that can be set to make an extension load ahead of the default file type, after which everything else loads in alphabetical order.  Users would often insert a space at the front of an extension's filename in order to force it to the front of the alphabetical queue.  I can't remember the alternate file type off the top of my head, but I have changed it on some of my extensions in the past when inserting a space in the filename wasn't sufficient to give it first priority (usually CPU upgrade extensions where the vendor hadn't changed it themselves already, and also Medianet).  I'm fairly certain the control panels load after the extensions, again in alphabetical order.

--- End quote ---

Thank you. Greatly helpful.  I do recall the documents on writing extensions differentiated between two type.  I will no go an a treasure hunt for that info.

DieHard:

--- Quote ---Users would often insert a space at the front of an extension's filename in order to force it to the front of the alphabetical queue.  I can't remember the alternate file type off the top of my head
--- End quote ---

Yes, we would often prioritize when getting conflicts by loading extensions (with a space)... 1) CPU (if applicable), 2) SCSI Cards, 3) Network Cards, Video... then rest although I think the Video extensions were already "tagged" as priority... been 20 years since hunting down extensions manually so it's hard to remember... this was the Mac OS 8.1 days; OS 9.2 is very rarely plagued by such issues. Also, "Color" labeling the initial OS load set (As I mentioned in previous posts), helped track down new extensions that may be problematic.

nanopico:
I updated the order of things to what I have found.  Still a work in progress so expect it to change more as I find more info.

nanopico:
For anyone interested in what the managers are that existing in the Macintosh OS here's a list. If you read all of Inside Macintosh you will be able to understand them all. You literally have to read all of Inside Macintosh to understand it since it's not all documented in one section.
Going through that you start to get an idea of the order that these are initialized and start to understand the boot process.

Typically a manager is a library of function and data structures.  When a manager is loaded there is an initialization routine that runs to setup the structures.  Any time one of it's functions are called it updates the structure accordingly.  There are some exception where some of them respond to an interrupt or trap and then perform it's duties, but other than that, they just sit there doing nothing until an application calls a method.  They are a lot like the background services that run in modern OS.

Listed in no particular order. I'm still trying to figure out the exact order these start in and what starts between them.

* Resource Manager
* Scrap Manager
* Help Manager
* List Manager
* Component Manager
* Translation Manager
* Desktop Manager
* Mixed Mode Manager
* Code Fragment Manager
* Exception Manager
* Device Manager
* Slot Manager
* SCSI Manager
* ADB Manager
* Power Manager
* Font Manager
* Script Manager
* Text Services Manager
* Dictionary Manager
* Sound Manager
* Sound Input Manager
* Speech Manager
* Image Compression Manager
* Process Manager
* Time Manager
* Verticle Retrace Manager
* Notification Manager
* Deferred Task Manager
* Segment Manager
* Shutdown Manager
* Gestalt Manager
* Trap Manager
* Start Manager
* Package Manager
* Memory Manager
* Virtual Memory Manager
* Event Manager/Toolbox Event Manager
* Menu Manager
* Window Manager
* Control Manager
* Dialog Manager
* Edition Manager
* Data Access Manager
* Printing Manager
* File Manager
* Alias Manager
* Disk Initialization Manager
* Digital Signature Manager
* Interprogram Messaging Manager
* Catalog Manager
* Authentication Manager

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