Classic Mac Hardware (Troubleshooting, Upgrading, & Modifying) > Storage Technologies

"Invalid Btree Header, 0, 0" error...

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IIO:
no need for any third party software here.

like mactron said it is enough to copy the files to another volume, initialise the corrupt one, and copy the files back.

you can do that with OS9, but eventually copying in OSX can be much faster.

and dont copy 1 million files at once, do it in smaller branches.

GaryN:
From a previous discussion here:

--- Quote from: GaryN on September 09, 2015, 04:19:32 PM ---I've been running a dual-boot MDD for a very long time. I had constant mysterious directory-related problems early on. However, I never once had a problem - as far as I could tell - with 9 writing something to X. (Of course, I never allowed 9 to attempt to rebuild the X desktop or some such folly)

On the other hand, I had constant recurring problems on my 9 drive until I set the preferences in OSX to keep both Time Machine and Spotlight from caring about - and therefore writing to - the OS9 drive. I haven't had any issues since.

I'm well aware there are those well-informed folks on this forum (you know who you are) who absolutely insist that operating a dual-boot Mac is the guaranteed path to cyber hell and damnation, but evidently I'm either blessed or damn lucky or the solution is simple: just treat the two systems as though they're Shiites and Sunnis - don't let them talk to each other and peace will prevail…

--- End quote ---

I repeat: In my long experience, it is Spotlight and Time Machine (if you have Leopard) that both write stuff on ALL of the drives / partitions in your computer that cause the b-tree errors in OS9. You MUST lock your OS9 volume out from them in their System Prefs settings even if you don't use Spotlight or Time Machine.

It's the indexing function in OSX that writes the gobbledegook. When you see your system slow down in OSX and there's that little "mds" owned by "nobody" running in Activity monitor, OSX is busy indexing every single file it can find wherever it's allowed to go look and writing little notes to itself in that volume header. It does the same thing if you run Disk Utility on a volume.

Disk First Aid in OS9 can't fix it because it doesn't understand it.
Disk Utility in OSX won't fix it because as far as it knows, there's nothing wrong!

I was about to give up on my MDD entirely at one point because of this insanity. But I'm Polish and very stubborn, so I just kept at it and at it. Since I did the above over 4 years ago, I have not had a single one of those b-tree issues! I'm pretty damn sure I've found the cause and the cure.

My MDD now has 4 drives, 7 volumes, 3 OS's (9, 10.4 and 10.5) and no b-tree issues.

Philgood:

--- Quote from: GaryN on November 30, 2015, 04:05:43 PM ---I repeat: In my long experience, it is Spotlight and Time Machine (if you have Leopard) that both write stuff on ALL of the drives / partitions in your computer that cause the b-tree errors in OS9. You MUST lock your OS9 volume out from them in their System Prefs settings even if you don't use Spotlight or Time Machine.

It's the indexing function in OSX that writes the gobbledegook. When you see your system slow down in OSX and there's that little "mds" owned by "nobody" running in Activity monitor, OSX is busy indexing every single file it can find wherever it's allowed to go look and writing little notes to itself in that volume header. It does the same thing if you run Disk Utility on a volume.

Disk First Aid in OS9 can't fix it because it doesn't understand it.
Disk Utility in OSX won't fix it because as far as it knows, there's nothing wrong!

I was about to give up on my MDD entirely at one point because of this insanity. But I'm Polish and very stubborn, so I just kept at it and at it. Since I did the above over 4 years ago, I have not had a single one of those b-tree issues! I'm pretty damn sure I've found the cause and the cure.

My MDD now has 4 drives, 7 volumes, 3 OS's (9, 10.4 and 10.5) and no b-tree issues.

--- End quote ---

How exactly can i achieve this ?
Do i have to kind of safe boot the osx partition to prevent that the system writes to the os9 partition while i do the necessary terminal commands to hide the partition for the next time?
Can you provide some guide please?

mrhappy:

--- Quote from: GaryN on November 30, 2015, 04:05:43 PM ---From a previous discussion here:

--- Quote from: GaryN on September 09, 2015, 04:19:32 PM ---
You MUST lock your OS9 volume out from them in their System Prefs settings even if you don't use Spotlight or Time Machine.


--- End quote ---

Yes It would be useful to have a little 'OS 9 Locking' tutorial here! ;D
--- End quote ---

GaryN:

--- Quote from: Philgood on December 03, 2015, 02:41:57 AM ---How exactly can i achieve this ?
Do i have to kind of safe boot the osx partition to prevent that the system writes to the os9 partition while i do the necessary terminal commands to hide the partition for the next time?
Can you provide some guide please?

--- End quote ---

No no no no! You are completely overthinking it!
Actually, it's ridiculously simple. You have to first repair the damage and then stop the process causing it. To wit:

1.  Boot OSX.
2.  Open System Prefs.
3.  Select Spotlight / Privacy. You'll see a list form "Prevent Spotlight from searching these locations".
4.  Drag your OS9 volume icon onto the list.
5.  Go to Time Machine Prefs. Click "Options"…you'll get the same kind of drop-down form called "Do not back up".
6.  Drag your OS9 volume icon onto the list.

NOW: You can erase your b-tree-corrupted OS9 volume and then restore it from backup (which you of course, have, right?) BUT
You cannot just restore the entire volume whole because it probably also contains a corrupted header… SO

7.  Boot OS9 from CD (either your own or MacTron's Rescue CD is perfect) and reinstall OS9.
8.  Restore your OS9 files from your backup folder by folder.
9.  You're done.

Yes, it's THAT simple. Just never, never again allow those pref settings to get changed back. If you upgrade OSX or add another version of OSX to the computer, IMMEDIATELY go to all OSX prefs and confirm that OS9 is locked out.

You'll find that you can still "see" all the OS9 files from OSX so you can open them, copy them etc. You just can't search them by / for keywords and such with Spotlight and of course, you'll have to backup OS9 with something other than Time Machine - which is fine because Time Machine won't make a useable OS9 restoration anyway. (It usually messes up all of the file permissions and you can't write to them or even move them afterward when you're back in OS9)

Now, enjoy your happily dual-booting Mac!

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