Author Topic: Korg Oasys + G4  (Read 7022 times)

Offline Protools5LEGuy

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Korg Oasys + G4
« on: April 04, 2015, 05:01:41 PM »
http://www.ebay.es/itm/Korg-OASYS-PCI-plus-Powermac-G4-/151636097204?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item234e3738b4




That card is really a good thing, not like 1212.
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Korg OASYS PCI card in original box. It is fully functional and comes with analogue and digital breakout cables. It is running in a Powermac G4 that is in good condition apart from some marks on the outer casing, and all fans have recently been replaced. The Mac has OS9 installed - the card will run on OS9 or Windows 98. Drivers are installed for the MOTU Fastlane and Midisport 2X2 interfaces.

The card is capable of many types of synthesis including analogue modelling, FM and physical modelling. It is controlled by the software editor running on the Mac - the third image shows an example patch running in the editor. For full details all documentation can be downloaded from Korg’s website here: http://i.korg.com/SupportPage.aspx?productid=482

The Sound On Sound review is available here: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr00/articles/korgoasys.htm

The following is taken from Korg’s own description of the OASYS PCI:

OASYS PCI's synthesizer algorithms represent a continual evolution from Korg's legendary OASYS project. There are hundreds of sounds based on over 40 great-sounding synthesis algorithms, including modeled analog synths, VPM, tonewheel organ and rotary speaker, reed and tine pianos, physically modeled trumpet, trombone, sax, flute, guitar, bass, and vocals, pipe organ, analog percussion, and more - including the 16 new sample-based synth plug-ins included with version 2.0!

Synthesis algorithms are plug-ins loaded from disk, allowing easy upgrades and expansion. This means that Korg and third-party sound developers can easily introduce new algorithms, or even entirely new types of synthesis.
   


Incredible Multichannel Effects Processing

Building on the award- winning Korg Trinity's effects algorithms, the OASYS PCI offers a stunning variety of high-quality effects - over 130 different algorithms in all. Included are everything from standard reverbs, choruses, flangers, phasers, overdrives, and amp simulations to unique effects such as random filter, stepped phaser, doppler shift, and talking modulator. Additional new effects include tempo delays, modulation via MIDI-sync'd LFOs and analog-style sequencers, envelope and LFO-swept filters, new high-quality analog EQ and reverb algorithms, an awesome 160 second maximum delay time, and more.

These effects can process the onboard synthesizers, tracks from digital audio programs, and live audio inputs - simultaneously!

Using the built-in submixer, chains of up to 4 effects each can be used on up to 12 channels, 4 sends, and 6 stereo output busses. As with synthesis algorithms, all effects are plug-ins loaded from disk, allowing for easy expansion in the future.


Professional, Multi-format Analog and Digital I/O

The OASYS PCI features a total of 12 inputs and outputs: stereo analog, stereo S/PDIF, and eight-channel ADAT optical. Naturally, all inputs and outputs are 24-bit, and all can be used simultaneously with compatible multitrack audio software. Korg knows that in music, timing is everything, and so the onboard DSP processing power provides zero-latency record monitoring - even with effects!

Korg always keeps the needs of professional studios in mind, so we've provided Word clock and ADAT timecode I/O to ensure easy integration with other digital audio equipment.

 
   

 

Not Just "Me Too" Analog Synths

Our analog synths are audibly superior to other "analog modelling" products. After listening to the OASYS PCI, we think you'll agree that other "virtual" analog synths sound...well...kind of virtual.

 

Oscillators

So, what should you listen for? To start with, our oscillators are rich, bright, and smooth, with extremely low jitter and aliasing. We've worked hard to eliminate the usual artifacts of digital oscillators.

 

Filters

OASYS PCI's filters are warm and fat, with resonance extending to frequencies far above typical digital "analog" filters. They're flexible, too, with many algorithms offering a choice of poles and modes. There's also a special, fully modulatable comb filter, for sounds like you've never heard before!

 

Envelopes

Finally, the envelopes are punchy, smooth, and lightning-fast, and use audio-rate processing just like old-school analog envelopes. In the examples below, notice also how OASYS PCI's envelope continues to create a filter "blip" even when it's very fast, while Brand X's envelope almost disappears.

 

In addition to several flexible analog synth algorithms, which allow you to make your own balance between features and polyphony, we've included a few incredible re-creations of classic analog synths, as described below.

 

Prophet™ model

OASYS PCI's Pro Synth model features specifically tailored filter resonance, envelope shapes, and VCA output nonlinearity, along with poly mod, sync, and simultaneous waveforms, just like the original.

 

Minimoog™ model

The Mini Synth model features specific and separate modelling of the synth's high and low frequency filter resonance, as well as its distinctive envelope shapes and VCA sound.

 
   

 

Percussion synth

This synth is optimized for analog-modeled percussion, with a hard-hitting, punchy sound.

There are several versions of the percussion synth, including one coupled with an Electribe-inspired percussion sequencer.

The sequencer is modulatable in real-time - and syncs to MIDI clocks, of course!

 

VPM synthesis

VPM stands for Virtual Phase Modulation, in which the phase of one oscillator (the Carrier) is modulated by another oscillator (the Modulator), producing a complex timbre. VPM is great for creating classic digital bells, electric pianos, and special effects, and OASYS PCI offers several different VPM synths to choose from.

 

Physical modeling - the future of synthesis arrives

OASYS PCI's analog synths are awesome - but they're only a small part of the story. Korg has been on the forefront of physical modeling research for almost a decade, and we're proud to present the fruits of that research in OASYS PCI.

OASYS PCI includes models of electro-acoustic instruments, such as organ and electric piano, along with models of physical instruments, such as guitar, slap bass, trumpet, trombone, flute, saxophone, and even human vocals.

Of course, traditional sample playback instruments also provide these sorts of sounds. So, why use physical modeling? Three reasons: expression, realism, and sound quality.

Expression

Physical modeling generates sound in real-time, by modeling the actual physical characteristics of the instrument and the player. This allows you to "reach inside" and play the model just as you would a real acoustic instrument, such as plucking a string gently or firmly, or blowing into a trumpet loudly or softly. Using this real-time control, you can shape phrases or even individual notes in natural, intuitive ways, for an unusual degree of musical expression.

Realism

Models respond to your playing in organic and sometimes unpredictable ways, just like real acoustic instruments. Pitch-bend the flute model, for instance, and it will slowly bend a bit, grow a little unstable, and then abruptly jump an octave. Play fast and loud on the trumpet, and the transitions between notes will sometimes include a subtle "blat" of instability; do a pitch-bend, and it "rips" through the harmonic series. Play hard on the acoustic guitar, and you'll sometimes hear a string "twang" brightly. These organic "imperfections" combine to give the player - and the listener - an uncanny sensation of reality.

Sound quality

Modeling also offers an edge in sound quality. For instance, modeling all 91 tone-wheels in an organ means that they are all precisely in phase, resulting in the pure, powerful sound of the genuine article. Use vibrato on a guitar, and notice how satisfying it is to hear a string "stretching."
   

 

Tonewheel organ with rotary speaker

We're extremely proud of our tonewheel organ model. Its awesome sound starts with perfect tonewheel phase coherency, resulting in pure, powerful sounding chords, just like the real thing.

Then, we added subtle and sophisticated features such as complete drawbar control, fully programmable key click, and true mono percussion. Compare this model to sampled organs, with their fixed drawbar settings, out-of-phase chords, and percussion on every note, and you'll hear the difference immediately.

Best of all, the organ is fully polyphonic (61 notes at a time) and yet, even combined with both authentic vibrato and rotary speaker effects, it uses only half of the OASYS PCI's DSP power!

Naturally, with a B3 model this good, we had to have an equally impressive rotary speaker. So, we included the incredibly realistic rotary speaker model from Korg's acclaimed Toneworks G4.

 

Electric piano model

OASYS PCI's reed electric piano model (based on a classic instrument whose name begins with "W") features natural, smooth velocity sensitive transitions from soft, sweet, and bell-like to loud, overdriven, and cutting. You can select the type of pickup, and the position of the pickup on the reed. As you move the pickup towards center, it hears more and more of the first harmonic, as shown in the demo below.

Guitar and Slap Bass models

Our acoustic guitar model features fully adjustable string gauge, bridge rigidity, pick type and technique, pickup position and tone, string damping, and more. You can morph from steel string to nylon string to a surreal "plucked iron girder" guitar - or simply mute and unmute the strings, smoothly, in realtime.

The Poly Physical voice allocation keeps track of which strings you play. When you re-strike a note which is still sounding, the string will continue to ring out - just like a real string.

 

Trumpet and Trombone models

The physically modeled trumpet and trombone algorithms feature modeled lip embouchure, valves and slides, and bells, resulting in rich tone, magnificent expressiveness, and realistic "falls" and "rips."

 

Sax and Flute models

Our physically modeled woodwinds respond to breath pressure (or other midi controllers) with incredible realism. The sax model features realistic growl and fingering noise, while being free of the formant shifts characteristic of sampled saxophones.

The flute model is capable of everything from sweet, classical tones to edgy, breathy, chiffy pop and ethnic timbres. Pitch-bend it for an authentic octave mode-jump.

 

Vocal model

With OASYS PCI's physically modeled human vocals, you can control the shape of the glottal pulse, noise components, and transitions between vowels, to create other-worldly melodies, pads, and effects.
Looking for MacOS 9.2.4

supernova777

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2015, 09:26:00 PM »
what do u mean not like the 1212... wahts wrong with the 1212
http://www.oldschooldaw.com/forums/index.php?topic=552.0

despite being old (from 1996)

Offline Protools5LEGuy

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2015, 09:30:46 PM »
what do u mean not like the 1212... wahts wrong with the 1212
http://www.oldschooldaw.com/forums/index.php?topic=552.0

despite being old (from 1996)
1212 had bad reputation. At least on Windows + Logic

Also, the synth is way more modern
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supernova777

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2015, 09:44:17 PM »
Modern?? LOL its actually OLDER then the 1212

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1995_articles/mar95/korgoasys.html

this was supposed to come out in 1995!!! but never saw the light of day untill 5 years later..
interesting

Quote
Up to now, we've had analogue synths, sample-based digital synths, FM digital synths, wavetable digital synths and, more recently, physical modelling synths. Korg's new Oasys synth is based upon 'open-architecture' digital signal processing, which means it can be whatever its software tells it to be. DSP, being digital, can't produce true analogue synthesis, but Oasys can accurately emulate it, so what Korg are telling us is that their new baby can be anything you want it to be -- and it can be several different things at the same time. Apparently, the machine has up to 32-part multitimbrality and can combine different methods of synthesis, allowing you to use, for example, analogue-sounding bass parts, FM piano parts and physically-modelled sounds in one composition. 20-bit D-to-A conversion at a 48kHz sampling rate also ensures a high degree of audio fidelity.

Offline acelera

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2015, 01:39:37 AM »
It is not older than the 1212. The 1212 came first and was just 20bit at best. :)

The Oasys Project is but that never materialised in its original form. The actual PCI card came out around 2002, I think? I found a New Old Stock one recently and have put it in my Magma 13 PCI slot chassis next to my Mix Core, Mix Farms and Samplecells. They sold very few as it was super expensive and eventually recycled the idea into the original Oasys keyboard a few years later and then the Kronos after that.

The sound is really really good and there are still some plugin developers active on the platform. Harm Visser is one of them. Dan Phillips of Korg also made some plugins and so did John Bowen, who is also known for the Solaris Synth and his plugins for the Creamware/SonicCore Scope platform.


supernova777

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2015, 05:13:04 AM »
It is not older than the 1212. The 1212 came first and was just 20bit at best. :)

did u read the article i posted?
it was supposed to come out in 1995... but never was released commercially untill 2000.

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1995_articles/mar95/korgoasys.html

^^ read this
MARCH 1995...... about 2 years before the korg 1212

technically though -- we are both right.. lol
but really -- have a good look at the computer on the box of the card itself.. does that look like a computer from 2000-2002? hell no!!!
1995? yes;)

Offline acelera

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2015, 04:08:38 AM »

Yes, I know it was "meant" to come out in 1995 but still took an age to do so and actually did in 1999 in the US, at least according to Wikipedia but could well as been 2000, more so judging by when I bought mine as well as your research.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korg_OASYS_PCI

I got my first Oasys on a blowout price of 420 pounds from Turnkey around 18 months after it first went on sale. Korg had a real issue getting them out at the original $2100 price tag and that's no surprise. The funny thing is that a few months later, Turnkey offered to buy it back off of me at full price as a music school wanted to get all remaining stocks of them for a sound design class of theirs so I took them up on the offer and remained Oasys-less for the next 12 years :( :)

I guess that fully explains my background on the issue.

Either way, the Korg1212 is best avoided as awful converters and barely does 16bit properly never mind anything else. It also had a serious bug with ADAT clocking which required sending the card back to Korg Service so they soldered a wire over it (!). I know because one of my studio clients had one in a Beige G3 which was then the current top level Mac at the time.

Hope this helps. Just trying to provide more info... :) It's nice to know the fuller picture with those vintage ítems.

supernova777

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2015, 05:31:30 AM »
yes absolutely im by no means trying to reccommend that anyone buy a korg 1212!! lol
it was a bit of a game changer at the time to say the least but yeah it had its day.. + is best left to the annals of history :D hehhehe

but 20bit isnt neccessarily a bad thing.. im very fond of the sound from my gina 20bit cards!! i dunno why but to my ears the card still sounds ace!!!

Offline DieHard

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Korg 1212...
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2015, 10:07:58 AM »
I remember the Korg 1212 was a high latency POS.  It tracked horribly (thin sound on lows and low mids) and had high latency (as far as ASIO drivers and VST 5).

It holds it's place in my mind as the worst thing I ever saw Korg Produce.

Now as far as a Korg M1... that was so impressive back in the day(Circa 1988)...I remember me and two other studio engineers loosing sleep for 2 days while falling in love with it.  That is why I am going to assume another company made the 1212 and Korg marketed it... or maybe, they were just behind in the computer interface market at the time

http://www.vintagesynth.com/korg/m1.php

Offline mrhappy

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2015, 12:11:12 PM »
I also remember being quite enamored when the M1 made the scene!!! It was BETTER than sliced bread even!! ;D ;D

Offline Protools5LEGuy

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2015, 02:40:45 PM »
The M1 Piano (a little metalic) sound has made hundreds of hits!

I love when a cuban piano player plays a Tumbao http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumbao with that M1 piano sound
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bo8dg3BP7Q" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bo8dg3BP7Q</a>
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supernova777

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Re: Korg 1212...
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2015, 01:49:32 PM »
That is why I am going to assume another company made the 1212 and Korg marketed it... or maybe, they were just behind in the computer interface market at the time



maybe it was the mac drivers programming/support was just sucky.
u mention asio drivers.. but at time of release, i dont even think ASIO was invented then!!!
(it may or may not have been - http://comp.ist.utl.pt/ec-ra/Laboratorio/ASIO%20SDK%202.pdf this document states 1997 as the first copyright date for the ASIO sdk API)
remember it was early/mid 1997 that the korg 1212 hit the streets.. a different time.. 
i was using a Sound Blaster AWE64 gold that i thought was the bomb at the time! on my win95  packard bell pentium system in 1997..

the pentium II had just been released.. and there was no G3 chip yet.. only 600 series PowerPC cpus
im surprised those cpus could handle multitrack ADAT audio at all!!!!!!!!
Are u sure that the "percieved shittyness" didnt have more to do with the fact that people
were running it on such slow cpus?? plus the hard drives of those days were CRAP total crap
even the best SCSI drives were crap really. hard disk recording with that slow cpu / system bus / hard drive speed
must have been a total hit + miss garbage run - barely possible

7.6.1 had just been released in april of 1997 - mac os 8.0 was released soon after
windows 95 + windows NT + mac os 7.61 were very much current OS choices

Cubase Audio XT was probably the place it was used most... running on windows 95
and probably Cubase VST 3.5 on the mac, under 7.61 / 8.0

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1997_articles/jul97/korg1212.html

another thing to consider is ram.. what was a common RAM size in 1997?
i think it was still between 16-64MB of ram was the max in ANY MACHINE AT THE TIME!!
64 megabytes of ram.. ;) doing ADAT multichannel audio.. it was a miracle the shit even worked! lol

http://redhill.net.au/b/b-97.html
this page shows alot of motherboards (pc) that were taking up to 128, 256 + 384 mb of ram, but none higher then that..
and i think prior to 1997.. 64mb was the highest.... which would mean alot of pcs in 1997 would still have had 64mb or less.. unless they had a brand new machine they just shelled out mucho deniro for.

interesting to see ISA architecture still in full swing in 97.. i guess it wasnt untill 1998 or so that it started to go the way of the dodo bird!

heres a page listing all the macs from 1997
http://www.everymac.com/systems/by_year/macs-released-in-1997.html

the 9600 was new kid on the block :D
http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/powermac/specs/powermac_9600_350.html
came shipped with only 64MB RAM! + Twin Turbo 128 video pci
(i didnt know that was the oem vidcard on the 9600! interesting)

oops looks like i made a mistake
according to my post http://www.oldschooldaw.com/forums/index.php?topic=190.0 cubase audio xt didnt support the 1212.. i thought that it did.. my bad
« Last Edit: May 21, 2015, 04:50:31 PM by chrisNova777 »

Offline Protools5LEGuy

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Re: Korg 1212...
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2015, 02:10:20 PM »


Now as far as a Korg M1... that was so impressive back in the day(Circa 1988)...I remember me and two other studio engineers loosing sleep for 2 days while falling in love with it. 

Did you ever tested Korg T3? It sound fatter. A keyboard player told me the "filters" were "fatter" and with better design. Years before Korg O1/FD, the first one that "could" do GM files.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTRQf30EEFM" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTRQf30EEFM</a>
Looking for MacOS 9.2.4

Offline acelera

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #13 on: May 26, 2015, 03:01:29 AM »
I have the rack version of the T3, which came out as the M1Rex. It is essentially a Korg M1 with 8Mb of PCM ROM rather than 4Mb. The T1/T2/T3 also had a better sequencer and a floppy disk but I have not really considered the idea of hardware sequencing since my brief and terrible fling with the MPC2500.

Offline geforceg4

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Re: Korg Oasys + G4
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2016, 09:16:13 PM »
love the Korg M1 - too bad the Korg M1 never was made as a Mac os 9 Plugin! if it had been developed just 1 year earlier we would have KORG mac os 9 plugin for sure!!!!!!!! sucks:(

my solution is to use a windows or osx machine to run korg M1 plugin + route midi + audio back to whatever midi sequencer host app im using in mac os 9!!!  of course this means u need more midi/audio interfaces.. but thats what delta audiophiles are perfect for.. providing the midi + audio in/out to network back to your other machine